Jason Bateman’s BAD WORDS Tries Too Hard To Be Bad

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I really wanted to like Bad Words a lot more than I did. It had plenty of moments that were undoubtedly funny and well-executed, but at times, Jason Bateman’s feature directorial debut also felt forced. All the most vulgar moments are shown in the red band trailer, and the rest veers dangerously close to predictably heartfelt. In other words, it is a film that tries so hard to be “bad,” but is actually quite safe, not actually giving us anything nearly as edgy or new as it claims to; but, it still gives us something entertaining nonetheless.

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THE WOLF OF WALL STREET & GOODFELLAS: Martin Scorsese’s Best Double Feature Yet

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Martin Scorsese has two tendencies: the first is to make films that all follow a thematic or stylistic pattern, building off of one another and forming a canon of work that has since proved him to be a great auteur. Then there’s his tendency to break away from that and make something seemingly totally different than any of those defining films but which still, to varying extents perhaps, appeal to the masses.

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NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD: Why the Classic Still Holds Up

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Seeing a beloved classic or just a personal favorite replayed on a big screen years after its actual theatrical release can be like getting stuck in a cinematic time warp of sorts. We have come so far in our movie-making abilities that sometimes these older films come across like fossils or time capsules, evoking a strange combination of nostalgia, reverence, and laughter. Seeing George A. Romero’s 1968 masterpiece Night of the Living Dead in a small but beautiful art house movie theater was, on one level, such an experience. Continue reading “NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD: Why the Classic Still Holds Up”